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Besides photographs, each user's profile could include any number of personal details including age, height, weight, education, marital status, number of children, and smoking and drinking habits.

The data set includes some 1.1 million interactions between users.

Indeed, that seems to have been at least part of the motivation behind the hack, along with the CTO's proclamation that the company's "Full Delete" service completely erased all the data.

Earlier that year, hook-up site Adult Friend Finder was also hacked, with the personal details of nearly four million users leaked, including their IP addresses and dates of birth.

Not according to a study of more than 1 million interactions on a dating website published this week in the .

Instead, the results indicate that you are probably looking for "deal breakers," harshly eliminating those who do not live up to your standards. People met their romantic partners through the recommendations of friends, family, or even at real-world locations known as "bars." Whatever signals and decisions led people to couple up were lost to science. According to the Pew Research Center, 5% of Americans in a committed romantic relationship say they met their partner through an online dating site.

a group of Danish researchers publicly released a dataset of nearly 70,000 users of the online dating site Ok Cupid, including usernames, age, gender, location, what kind of relationship (or sex) they’re interested in, personality traits, and answers to thousands of profiling questions used by the site.

When asked whether the researchers attempted to anonymize the dataset, Aarhus University graduate student Emil O. Kirkegaard, who was lead on the work, replied bluntly: “No.

However, all the data found in the dataset are or were already publicly available, so releasing this dataset merely presents it in a more useful form.

Sensitive personal data including cookies, API keys, and passwords has been leaked by web optimization giant Cloudflare.

The company — which provides SSL encryption to millions of sites across the internet — announced the leak in a detailed post on its blog last night.

The “already public” excuse was used in 2008, when Harvard researchers released the first wave of their “Tastes, Ties and Time” dataset comprising four years’ worth of complete Facebook profile data harvested from the accounts of cohort of 1,700 college students.

And it appeared again in 2010, when Pete Warden, a former Apple engineer, exploited a flaw in Facebook’s architecture to amass a database of names, fan pages, and lists of friends for 215 million public Facebook accounts, and announced plans to make his database of over 100 GB of user data publicly available for further academic research.

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